Thursday Doors: Still Stuck In The Past

Last week I featured a post on cast iron wood stoves from Black Creek Pioneer Village, and this week I have another door I discovered while I was there.

Black Creek

This semi-underground cold storage area would have been a place of nightmares for me as a kid.  Come to think of it, if I had discovered any kind of creepy-crawly in there, I would likely have been off running – and probably screaming along the way.

Black Creek2

These storage cellars would have been important for the early pioneers to preserve apples, potatoes etc over the long Canadian winters.

However, this cellar also reminded me of another storage place from my own “pioneer past” … a old wooden barn with a dirt floor that used to stand on my parent’s property up until about 20 years ago.  It had the same dark, creepy feeling with an undercurrent of I-don’t-really-want-to-go-in-there.

Barn - cochrane

December 1994

This old barn was used by my dad for storing his unending supply of stuff-I-might-need-someday … an affliction suffered by most survivors of the 1930’s and the Great Depression.

Originally, the barn was actually used to house chickens that my grandmother kept and later a horse used for grocery deliveries.  Of course, both were long gone by the time I came along.  I knew it only as a creepy black hole of horror.

I used to cringe every time one of my parents sent me to the barn to look for something. Regardless of whatever it might have been, I never found it … possibly because I never ventured further than the door frame.

… and here I was on a warm sunny day at the Pioneer Village, peering carefully from the door frame into a cold storage cellar that unexpectedly drudged up old memories.

********************************************************************

Thursday Doors is a weekly photo feature hosted by Norm 2.0.

 

About Joanne Sisco

Retired but not idle. Life is an adventure - I plan to continue to embrace it.
This entry was posted in Memories, photography, Random Stuff, Thursday Doors and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

100 Responses to Thursday Doors: Still Stuck In The Past

  1. Pingback: Thursday Doors: Come On In | My Life Lived Full

  2. We had a cellar under the house when I was growing up. I had much the same reaction to being sent down there. [shudder]

    Like

    • joannesisco says:

      So there it is … children all over the world do not like being sent into dark dingy places where creepies could be lurking.
      What more evidence do we need that we are all basically the same? 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I’ll go you one better Joanne. My grandparents had a tiny cellar for food storage that was not bricked but had dirt floors and walls. In the hallway just outside the kitchen there was a rug-covered trap door with a tiny handmade ladder that dropped down into that gaping maw. At least that’s what this sissy city kid thought at the time. I haven’t had therapy, but I probably needed it after a few trips down there. ~James

    Like

  4. reocochran says:

    Old memories of a creepy, packed to the rafters barn isn’t a positive result of this original and never featured before cellar door. I remember my grandparent’s double cellar doors, we usually never saw them unlocked but once at age 7, Grandpa Mattson asked me to accompany him on a black cherry jam and maple syrup jug “run.” Going down those stairs, smelling the musty scent and chilling cold made me rather excited that I was the oldest, allowed to “see” what was behind the forbidden doors, Joanne. Thank you for sharing about the cold storage area and your barn storage story, too. 🙂 It brought forth a “rite of passage” story from me.
    Hope you are having a fantastic Fourth of July!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. LB says:

    Love the history, the photos, and your story of going into that old barn

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Fantastic doors, Joanne. We had a very small cellar beneath our house when I was a child. I only ever went down there once, to fetch a stone bottle of Ginger Beer. I got so scared that I’ve never been able to drink it since. 🙂

    Like

  7. Mrs. P says:

    Fear is such a powerful weapon, even when it is self inflicted. I never had barns or basements but we had an abandoned house in the field behind us. One day when I was looking for my cat I ventured out there, walking around the house, calling my cat’s name. I swear my eight year old eyes saw the curtains move a few inch like someone was watching me. The second time around, it was the end of a rifle peeking out. It scared me enough to slowly back away and leave. I didn’t go into that area of the field again until they tore the house down.

    Like

    • joannesisco says:

      Holy Cow!! I would have had a cow! Suddenly spiders aren’t sounding so bad after all :/

      Like

      • Mrs. P says:

        I now wonder if I really saw a rifle or imagined it…at the time it was real and that was good enough for me.

        I only once befriended a spider. It was an ugly hideous looking thing and quite large. It would create this giant web in the agapanthus out side my kitchen windows. I never saw it move…it just sat there making its presence know…eventually I started having a bit of admiration for it and would look for it every morning. The only change I made in my life is that I never did any gardening in that bed while he was here. When he would leave, I’d clean the dead leaves and debris like crazy and wait for him to return again the next year.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Barbed Words says:

    I think all sensible people should have an aversion to basements – we’ve all shouted at the heroine of a horror film, ‘No! Don’t go down there!!!’

    Liked by 2 people

  9. My wife shares the same affliction. Not the “I-don’t-really-want-to-go-in-there” one, but the “stuff-I-might-need-someday” one. I think we need one of these cellars! 🙂

    Like

  10. Suvi says:

    I do find that door and cellar very interesting but would be hesitant to enter. Great to hear your stories about your childhood barn too 💕

    Like

  11. Prior-2001 says:

    I really liked seeing the bins in the cellar – and wondered how they stored the goodies – so this was nice . and laughing at the family barn and how you worded things… and yes, the Great Depression left an impression….

    Like

  12. The days of cold storage were a lot simpler as well as being harder. Love your doors. 🙂

    Like

    • joannesisco says:

      Thanks Judy. It’s funny that as I get older, I’m discovering a longing for the ‘simpler’ times. We tend to think it was simpler … but in so many ways, it wasn’t really 🙂

      Like

  13. I’m laughing, Joanne, as I see you just arrived at my blog as I arrived at yours…and we’re both doing old doors. Great door minds and all that!! I’d love to have a cellar now for storing food, but when I was growing up, my grandparents had a cellar on their farm house and I was NOT interested in going down there where there were spiders and box elder bug in addition to all the canned goods. 🙂

    janet

    Like

  14. Lovely memories. I understand that save everything mentality. I want to venture beyond the doors as I am not bothered by creepy crawlies or small places.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Chez Shea says:

    The stuff of nightmares and scary movies. Great door post!

    Like

  16. DailyMusings says:

    I love the doors to the cellar and the stones- but would not venture there in a hurry!

    Like

  17. bikerchick57 says:

    I don’t know why, but the cellar and barn reminded me of the Geico commercial…run for the chainsaws!

    As a child, I had a fear of the basement for a while. I didn’t want to go down there by myself because of the…you know…ghosts and the possibility that some horrible person was hiding around the corner…the same person that used to hide under my bed.

    Like

    • joannesisco says:

      Too funny!! I’ve never seen this before 😀

      I wasn’t overly fond of the basement either, but the only horrible person hiding around the corner or under my bed was my younger-older brother :/

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Ally Bean says:

    I understand your fear about going into that shed. When I was young we lived in a 100 year old house with a sub-basement in it. That is, the basement had a basement. It was so creepy. Only wish I had a photo of that door to share here. It was huge and heavy with a big old lock on it. *shudder*

    Like

  19. Tippy Gnu says:

    I think they make good tornado shelters also. Imagine hiding down there and a twister hits, and all those spiders start spinning around through the air around you.

    Like

  20. Sue Slaght says:

    Joanne we had many sheds like that on the farm. The funny thing is I loved going in those small quiet places and discovering what was there. Like Tess says I love the way you wove a story in with your door theme. Hoping today is going all right for you. xo

    Like

  21. We never had a root cellar. I was always fascinated about the ones I saw on television when we got in the late 60s.
    Nice tie-in between the doors with the story in between. Wonderful, Joanne. ❤ ❤ 😀

    Like

  22. jan says:

    My grandparents had a root cellar also – it gave me the willies as well. I wonder if anyone likes to go down into a cellar.

    Like

    • joannesisco says:

      I’m starting to think that’s why they fell out of practice. It had nothing to do with the advent of refrigeration, but everything to do with childhood aversion to bugs!

      Like

  23. Lovely photos but I’m like you and would never have gone in to those cellars either. I know what you mean about the creepy crawlies. I’m sitting with an ice pack on my neck at the moment because a huge spider came down from the ceiling in front of my face, about a half an hour ago, and as I tried to run from the room I tripped over the dog and head-butted the door. Fingers crossed I won’t have a neck as stiff as a board in the morning. 😮

    Like

    • joannesisco says:

      I’m so sorry … but the image of what you just described sent me into hysterical laughter!! … all the more funny because I’ve also managed to hurt myself in the past while trying to escape a spider .. or other such evil creature

      I think they secretly laugh at us behind our backs. {Hey Ralph – watch what happens when I drop down in front of her face}

      Liked by 1 person

    • Mrs. P says:

      Oh my, I do apologize for my out burst but this was too funny. I hope your neck feels better. I too have an aversion to spiders. When I was in grade school math class the boy who sat in front of me told me there was a spider in my hair. I immediately got up and shook my head upside down trying to make the spider get out, all the while screaming. When I felt it was a sufficient time to have shaken him out I stood up to see my whole class looking at me, mouths agape.

      Liked by 2 people

  24. Dan Antion says:

    That’s a great door Joanne, but it makes me think of creepy crawlies too. We visited family in Virginia every year that had a large farm. It had a few active barns, and several old scary places. No one would go in on their own, but put 2 or 3 cousins together and, well…

    Like

  25. This is so interesting Joanne! There are a lot of those in NY…not quite the same because they are usually metal double doors that open out to the stairway but still…I guess because so much in NY is built vertically and not so much in NY where there is limited horizontal space and no fear of earthquakes. Anyway, I had kind of taken these foregranted until I went back to NY and my kids commented on them. I remember a lot of them had been converted into rehearsal spaces. I’m sure many others are used for storage and I wouldn’t be surprised if there were people living in some!!

    Like

    • joannesisco says:

      I didn’t know that about NY. I think I would have been like your kids and wondered about them too.

      Space is such a premium in any city – but particularly NY – I wouldn’t be surprised to hear they are used as living spaces either … who knows? maybe vampires really do live among us 😉

      Like

      • Ha, ha! Well, if they do, they would be in NY for sure. I actually think I remember once when I was rehearsing at one of these studios, that was owned by a friend of mine, that one of our mutual friends was crashing there. Yikes!

        Liked by 1 person

  26. Norm 2.0 says:

    I love that first shot. Growing up in an apartment in the city those farmhouse cold cellars always seemed fascinating to me.
    My Grandmother was afflicted with great depression save-everything-just-in-case-itis too. She had a lord knows how many years supply of garbage bag twist-ties (even though she NEVER used them) and she also accumulated quite a pile of those plastic close-tabs from bread bags :-/

    Like

  27. nrhatch says:

    What a great root cellar ~ perfect spot to cool off on a HOT day.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Heyjude says:

    We have things called Ice houses on some of the big old estates where they would store ice and snow in the winter packed with insulation, often straw, to last throughout the year. You wouldn’t get me in one of those either, though I guess it would have been too cold for spiders!

    Like

    • joannesisco says:

      That reminds me of the Ice Box built into the wall of a hill on The Island when I was a kid. It was used for storing food that needed to be kept cold with blocks of ice… although by the time I was a kid, coolers were common and replaced the underground Ice Boxes.

      Liked by 1 person

  29. joey says:

    Great door! While I do not share your aversion to dark and creepy places, my children do. Asking them to enter any matter of outbuildings sets their faces to horrified. They often barter out chores to avoid it. A child in my house might be willing to take on all the other chores if a sibling would go fetch the shovel from the shed. Haha!

    Like

  30. We all had areas like that when we were kids. I feared our cellar as well. I was the only smart one in our house who knew that something wasn’t right down there. 🙂

    Like

  31. I love the door, and the bins inside the cellar! I always wonder how they kept the bugs er um…creep crawlies out of the onions, potatoes, and other foods they stored? That cellar looks nice and tidy but, I wouldn’t like going in it either, and I’d prop the door open somehow so it couldn’t accidentally close behind me!

    Like

    • joannesisco says:

      That’s exactly part of my terror!! … being locked inside.
      Might be because I had 2 older brothers and one in particular tormented my younger sister and I on a full time basis.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I always wished I had an older brother. I’m the oldest. I guess I got lucky since I didn’t get tormented or picked on then. 🙂

        How are you feeling? Hopefully you’re able to get around, and get yourself bathed, dressed, and make something light to eat, and aren’t in pain! Sending thoughts and keeping you in my prayers. xx

        Like

        • joannesisco says:

          I am the 4th of 5, so growing up with 2 older brothers was a bit challenging at times. There is a tendency to treat the younger siblings as *insignificant*.

          I’m making progress but it is a challenge. I had to be up at 5 am this morning because my husband is going out until later this afternoon. If I didn’t get up early, there would be no one to help me get dressed. Sigh. I predict a nap in my near future 😉

          Liked by 1 person

  32. You are so funny. Hmmm. Past life?
    Great pictures. I could use one of those 🙂

    Like

  33. Lynn says:

    Hmmm, my husband suffers from the affliction of I might need it some day! Perhaps he is from another time! Love this old door Joanne although I share your sentiment about venturing in to these creepy cellars!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s